Microsoft buys GitHub

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By far the dominant story from this week in the software development world involves Microsoft’s buyout of the source control giants, GitHub. In fact, we just talked about GitHub’s positive impact on the application engineering process in May’s news digest. Of course, this news spawned a lot of discussion and controversy within the developer community.

Let’s take a closer look at Microsoft’s purchase of GitHub with an eye on the reasons behind the acquisition as well as what it means for your app engineering shop. Is a new era in software development now upon us? Will it change how your team manages its source code?

The Details behind the Microsoft/GitHub Purchase

Microsoft buying GitHub isn’t just another example of Redmond crushing a competitor. Burning venture capital at a high rate over the past few years made GitHub a ripe target for acquisition. The giants in the industry, namely Amazon, Google, and Microsoft, all considered a purchase of the code-sharing organization.

According to an article in CNBC, GitHub preferred Microsoft due to the relationship between their founder, Chris Wanstrath, and Redmond CEO, Satya Nadella. Paying $7.5 billion meant MS paid nearly 25 times GitHub’s revenue, to use a stock analyst metric. Microsoft gains the benefit of a popular Cloud-based service for its Azure offering; part of its strategy to compete with Amazon AWS in the industry.

GitHub also pairs nicely with LinkedIn in the Redmond portfolio. It gives Microsoft access to a large number of software engineering and general technology professionals. The expectation is for GitHub to continue to operate in a largely independent fashion with the exception of a migration to Azure.   

Is this the End of the Open Source GitHub?

As we discussed last week, GitHub provides a great example of the positive influence of open source on the software development world. Back in the Steve Ballmer era, Microsoft earned a reputation as an enemy of open source software. “Linux is a cancer that attaches itself in an intellectual property sense to everything it touches,” said the MS CEO back in 2001.

Much of the gnashing and trashing in the developer community about a Microsoft-owned GitHub is a reflection of Redmond at the turn of the century. The Nadella-led company, on the other hand, is more of a champion of open source. The Visual Studio Code and .NET Core initiatives are examples of this new progressive attitude at Microsoft.

One of Nadella’s strategic goals involves fostering a developer-centric focus, or even emphasizing the one that already existed at Microsoft. GitHub fits perfectly with these plans. In fact, Microsoft closing its own competitor to the service – Codeplex – last year hinted at this week’s purchase. The added benefit of boosting Azure’s chances against AWS in the Cloud wars likely clinched their purchase decision.

Ultimately, when compared to Google or Amazon, Microsoft is arguably the better choice for GitHub. This especially rings true considering the company’s developer focus, as well as the embracing of open source under Satya Nadella. Nonetheless, every development shop currently using the source code service needs to consider whether staying makes sense for the long term.

Thanks for reading this edition of the Betica Blog. Stay tuned for additional dispatches from the never boring world of software development.

News from the World of Software Development – August 2017

Welcome to our regular look at interesting stories from the ever dynamic software development world; this time from the month of August. Hopefully, you find a bit of actionable information to help in your daily coding activities or perhaps the strategic direction of your organization. If interested in last month’s news digest, simply click on the following link.

New Product helps Companies keep track of DevOps Metrics

As DevOps continues to become part of the technology mainstream, companies struggle with determining the return on investment on their transition to a new methodology. DevOptics, a new product from CloudBees, aims to provide a means to track the efficacy of an organization’s DevOps processes and procedures. News about DevOptics appeared in August in Enterprise Times as well as other sources.

One of CloudBees’ major features is a real-time view of an organization’s software development pipeline, allowing managers and other key personnel to track the status of code changes as they are pushed from development to QA and eventually production. The hope is to lessen the number of meetings that tend to siphon productivity. Sacha Labourey, the CEO of CloudBees, commented on DevOptics.

“This is about data. We go through a lot of code changes, use a lot of tools, make a lot of modifications but all of the data vanishes. DevOps has been adopted in many, many cases as a feature that we replicate across the organizations. It’s a feature at scale not an enterprise solution. Now we are moving towards building a system of record for IT processes,” said Labourey.

If your organization is interested in how DevOptics can help keep a handle on your DevOps implementation, contact CloudBees to schedule a demo of the product. It just might be the missing piece of the puzzle for managing your software development projects.

Continuous Delivery – powered by AI – is the Future of Software Development

A recent article in The Next Web wonders if continuous delivery, assisted by artificial intelligence algorithms, is the future of software development. Considering how often we cover DevOps and continuous delivery here on the blog it is safe to wonder if that future is actually already here.

The Next Web article cites recent survey data from Evans Data that shows while a majority of companies – 65 percent – are using continuous delivery as part of their software development process, they only leverage it on a subset of their projects. Only 28 percent of surveyed organizations use it for all their applications.

Leveraging AI and machine learning as part of automation will play a key role in making continuous delivery commonplace. This is the opinion of Diego Lo Guidice of Forrester Research. “AI can improve the way we build current software; it will change the way we think about applications — not programming step by step, but letting the system learn to do what it needs to do — a new paradigm shift,” said Lo Guidice.

Expect artificial intelligence to continue to make inroads throughout the software development world, but especially in improving processes currently using automation. Once it does, continuous delivery – and DevOps for that matter – will truly become an industry standard.

Stay tuned to the Betica Blog for additional insights from the wide world of software development. As always, thanks for reading!