An Overview of the New MySQL 8.0

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MySQL remains a valid database option for companies looking for an alternative to Oracle or SQL Server. While it may not offer the enterprise-level horsepower of PostgreSQL, it still works well for many scenarios. This is likely why it maintains its status as the most popular open source database in the industry.

Recently, the folks behind MySQL released version 8.0 of the database. New features and functionality abound. Let’s take a high level overview of this new edition to see if there’s anything to help with your own software development projects.

The New Features in MySQL 8.0

The new version of MySQL added a whole host of enhanced SQL functionality. This includes support for window functions, common table expressions, as well as the NOWAIT and SKIP LOCKED statements. Most notably, window functions provide the ability to perform analytics on stored data; this is long-awaited feature as SQL Server added it in 2003.

They also added support for descending indexes which provides a performance improvement, especially when working with large datasets. The new GROUPING() function lets developers build datasets that distinguish super-aggregate rows from the results of GROUP BY queries. Both of these features were highly requested among the MySQL user community.

Boosting overall application performance becomes essential when using MySQL. Version 8.0 gives developers a new syntax for including optimizer hints. You simply place them using something similar to inline comment blocks after a SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, REPLACE, or DELETE statement.

Additionally, the new version adds optimizer hints for a variety of INDEX and JOIN statements.  Now developers can control index merge behavior for each individual query or even the table order when performing a join. The MySQL development team feels the new optimizer hint syntax makes it easier to use while also boosting code readability.

MySQL adds Improved JSON Support

The JSON format is essential for web applications that rely on transferring objects expressed as a data structure. MySQL 8.0 improves its support for JSON in a myriad of ways. First, it adds extended syntax for ranges when using JSON path expressions.

The new JSON table functions lets you use regular SQL statements when working with JSON data. This is a boon for developers especially skilled in writing SQL queries. It essentially creates a relational view of JSON data.

Other new JSON features in MySQL 8.0 include aggregation and merge functions. A boost in sorting performance and the ability to perform partial updates are also welcome. The former helps to optimize large applications while the latter makes replication processes faster.

Other New MySQL 8.0 Features

Another significant new feature in MySQL 8.0 is support for GIS, including the Spatial Reference System. This lets applications using the database to easily calculate global distances given a LAT and LONG. The database now supports bitwise operations on binary data types, making the processing of IPV6 addresses easier.

The MySQL query optimizer also gets some improvements beyond the new hint syntax. Histograms and better handing of data buffering help engineers boost overall app and database performance. Finally, the database boasts improved reliability, availability, and reporting with an eye towards being used at companies following DevOps.

In short, MySQL 8.0 adds a host of new features making the database more attractive to organizations with high-demand applications. The improved DevOps support is also welcome. For more detailed information on MySQL 8.0, simply click on this link.

Thanks for reading this edition of the Betica Blog. Keep returning for additional insights on the software development world.

A Closer Look at the MEAN Stack

The LAMP stack – which stands for Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP – has been standard practice for web development at many shops for nearly a decade. Since the one constant in the technology world is its rapid pace of change, it stands to reason a new standard is emerging in this software development space. The MEAN stack leverages many recent innovations in technology, including NoSQL databases in addition to some popular JavaScript libraries.

What follows is a high level overview of the MEAN stack to give you some food for thought before architecting your next web development project. Leverage these insights to make an informed decision on which development stack works best for your needs.

What is “MEAN?”

The MEAN stack is made up of MongoDB, one of the most preeminent NoSQL databases, used in combination with three popular JavaScript frameworks, ExpressJS, AngularJS, and Node.js. The fact that nearly all code for a MEAN project – from database to client – is written in JavaScript is one of the main reasons for its rapid growth. If your organization boasts a lot of JavaScript coding talent, it makes MEAN worthy of consideration on your next web project.

The Four Components of the MEAN Stack

MongoDB is a NoSQL document database widely popular for all kinds of applications. MongoDB is also available through many Cloud service providers, including Amazon AMS, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud. It leverages the JSON format for data transfer, making it highly appropriate as the database of choice for MEAN.

A lightweight framework for architecting web applications, ExpressJS was inspired by the popular Ruby library, Sinatra. It is a high performance framework well suited for both scalability and concurrency. It also facilitates the creation of unique APIs specifically for use in a web application.

AngularJS is a Google-developed framework for quickly building web-based user interfaces. It makes the creation of dynamic web pages a breeze; leveraging two-way data binding along with other useful features, including client-side code execution and support for the MVC model. Angular’s extensibility and flexibility enhances its compatibility with other frameworks and libraries, in addition to being a major component of the MEAN stack.

Node.js provides the server side execution environment for a MEAN application. Expect a high scalability factor even with a server farm charged with hosting multiple applications. Built upon version 8 of the Chrome JavaScript runtime engine, Node.js by itself is growing in usage among development teams.

The Advantages of the MEAN Stack

Obviously, the fact that all server and client code is written in JavaScript remains of the major advantages of the MEAN stack. Companies are able to take advantage of their staff’s familiarity with a scripting language that’s been around for two decades. Any overall learning curve is lessened by simply focusing on learning MEAN’s three libraries and MongoDB. 

The scalability features of ExpressJS and Node.js make the MEAN stack suitable for the highly concurrent web applications currently in vogue throughout the technology world. The flexibility of the libraries used in MEAN make it easy to swap out any of the components for a library (or database) more familiar to your development staff. It is definitely worthy of exploration for use in your team’s next web development project.

Keep returning to the Betica Blog for additional dispatches from the wide world of software development. Thanks for reading!