News from the World of Software Development – November 2017

Welcome to this month’s edition of the Betica Blog news digest, looking at a few recent stories of interest to the software development community. With the Holidays rapidly approaching, it becomes time to ramp up the effort to successfully reach your organization’s year end goals. Perhaps the stories within provide a measure of insight to inspire your team? If interested in last month’s digest, simply click on the following link.

Is DevOps’ Maturity Level being exaggerated by CIOs?

We regularly talk about DevOps: its growing adoption rate, the advantages it brings to the software development process, strategies on how to implement it, and more. A recent study by the tech industry research group, Forrester, notes that executives exaggerate the maturity level of their DevOps adoption. ZDNet reported on the study findings earlier this week.

In short, Forrester feels CIOs overstate their progress at implementing DevOps. According to the research firm: “[businesses] are gaining some speed, but the primary benefit connecting development and operations for both speed and quality is still elusive for many.” A major issue hampering full adoption involves the large cultural changes that need to happen for a successful implementation.

Increasing the speed of software delivery is one thing, but sometimes additional velocity comes at a cost in overall quality. This appears to be another issue affecting the perception of DevOps maturity. In fact, different perspectives exist between CIOs and DevOps practitioners as far as the overall success of the practice at their business.

Another reason executives exaggerate their organization’s success level with DevOps relates to overestimating the number of automated processes in place in their software development practice. Automation remains a key indicator of DevOps adding value to a company, according to Forrester.

Ultimately, Forrester concludes that “[f]or an enterprise to implement DevOps successfully, both executives and practitioners need to understand the current maturity state. Executives and practitioners differ widely in their perspectives on strategy, customer experience and progress they have made on their DevOps journey. When pros and executives are on the same page, your business wins!”

Microsoft lets F# target .NET Core Projects

Microsoft introduced .NET Core in August, an open source version of its software framework; an example of Redmond’s friendlier stance towards the open source software community. The preview version of Visual Studio, the company’s flagship IDE, allows F# programmers to target .NET Core as well the standard version of the framework. News about this new VS feature appeared this week in Visual Studio Magazine.

F# is Microsoft’s largely functional programming language that includes a measure of object-oriented and imperative methodologies. The F# Software Foundation also contributed to its development and produced an open source compiler for the language.

Microsoft’s Phillip Carter commented on the new F# support for .NET Core. “Finally, we are laying the groundwork for a long-term effort of migrating all F# projects to the new project system that .NET Core and .NET Standard projects use,” said Carter. Microsoft maintains a repository for their open source F# compiler and other related tools on GitHub.

Uses for F# abound; the language is especially known for its brevity and ease of maintenance. For example, Credit Suisse relies on the language for writing quantitative models for the financial industry. Other applications include asset portfolio optimization, machine learning, business intelligence, and more.

Hopefully this edition of the Betica Blog news digest provided some insight to help in your daily duties. As always, thanks for reading!

News from the World of Software Development – May 2017

Welcome to this month’s collection of a few interesting software development news stories from the last few weeks. If you want to check out April’s news digest, simply click on the following link. Hopefully, the content within this May digest offers a measure of insight for your software engineering activities. Good luck!

Agile making inroads in Government Software Development

Nearing its second decade of use, Agile is finally seeing wide adoption in software development at government agencies. Doug Robinson, the executive director of the National Association of State Chief Information Officers (NASCIO) in the United States reported that 81 percent of state CIOs plan on increasing the usage of Agile and other iterative development methodologies at their shops. News about this Agile implementation growth appeared this week at CRN.

“We’re seeing a lot of excitement in the CIO world to be able to deliver projects on time and within budget using some type of agile methodology,” said Robinson. As government entities tend to be slow to embrace new technology methodologies, this growth in adoption is another obvious sign of the continued maturity of Agile.

Small Teams write more Secure Code

Teams with a small number of developers produce more secure applications compared to groups with more than 20 employees. That is one of the main conclusions from the recently released 2017 CRASH Report, published by CAST Software. As applications grow in size and complexity, they simply become too difficult to manage.

A chief scientist at CAST Software, Bill Curtis, commented on the survey’s findings. “Applications have gotten so big and complex that no single team can understand it all. It might have five or six languages, multiple databases, CRM systems, and you can’t understand all the interactions. That leaves teams making assumptions that in many cases are wrong,” said Curtis.

Shops wanting to write more secure code need to invest in the relevant training for their developers, while giving them the tools for performing both static and dynamic testing. Additionally, involving a third-party team in the final vetting of an application’s security offers a valuable second opinion before the code is deployed to production.

Microsoft switches to Git for Windows Code Source Control

Considering Microsoft’s investment in its own source control systems, it comes as somewhat of a surprise that the tech giant is migrating all the source code for its Windows operating system to the popular open source tool, Git. News about this move appeared this week in Ars Technica.

The reasoning behind this shift lies within Microsoft’s OneCore project which is aimed at simplifying the Windows codebase. Their previous source control solution for Windows, SourceDepot, was straining to handle the massive amount of source code involved, which includes 3.5 million files.

Redmond chose Git because of developer familiarity as well as its open source nature. The basic Git application needed to be updated to seamlessly handle the Windows source code. Microsoft created a fork in the Git code for this purpose and is talking with the other industry giants who use the app – Google and Facebook – about combining their efforts in the future.

Make a visit to the Betica Blog part of your daily routine before firing up your IDE in the morning. As always, thanks for reading!

News from the Worlds of Software Development and QA – October 2016

Microsoft Teams is the next Slack competitor; How containers is becoming hot item on serverless infrastructures and more news this October!

With the Autumn season in full force and Halloween approaching, it is time to take another look at a few interesting recent news stories from the software development and QA industry. If you want to check out last month’s news digest, simply click on the following link. Hopefully, this month’s digest gives you and your team some inspiration and insight on your own development and testing duties.

Microsoft to release a Slack Competitor

With the Agile and DevOps methodologies requiring software development teams to communicate better with each other as well as business stakeholders, clients, and network engineers, highly functional messaging apps are currently in vogue in the industry. We previously talked about the growth of ChatOps, and Slack is another popular application aimed at fostering collaboration at the enterprise.

Those watchful eyes in Redmond have been taking note of Slack’s popularity, as shown by the recent news Microsoft is planning to release their own competitor to the app. Called Microsoft Teams – it was known as Skype Teams during development – the tool is expected to be available early in November.

In addition to text messaging, users are able to share files, aggregate texts into different channels, as well as embed emojis and other graphics. Integration with Microsoft’s Cloud-based storage service, One Drive is also expected, along with a built-in calendar. In short, these are many of same features provided by Slack.

ChatOps functionality, including integration with Microsoft’s Visual Studio and other third-party development tools, will make Teams more attractive to the software development community.

Docker making the QA Process more Efficient

Docker’s emphasis on container-like structures to hold development and testing environments continues to make aspects of software development and network management more efficient. This growing trend now impacting software testing was noted this month by InfoWorld magazine. The article serves as a primer for QA team leads and development managers hoping to leverage containers to streamline the QA function at their shop.

The author notes the small size of a Docker container enhances their portability, especially when compared to virtual machines. Their simplicity in Cloud deployment makes it easy to perform load testing on a web app or API. He also discusses how Docker facilitates the testing and deployment of individual services in applications using a microservices architecture.

Anyone interested in using Docker as part of their development and QA processes needs to read the full article, as it is filled with great tips and insights on how to implement the tool in QA environments.

Containers revolutionizing the Software Development World

Containers are definitely a hot item in the software development news this month. This week, the Wall Street Journal published an article describing how container infrastructures are ushering in an era of “serverless” computing. Seen by many industry pundits as a maturing of the Cloud services market, serverless computing essentially means an application is hosted within a container at a Cloud-based provider.

“If you’re moving into the next generation of big shifts like [artificial intelligence] and machine learning, the underlying infrastructure that supports that stuff will be serverless,” said the CTO for GE, Chris Drumgoole. One major Cloud provider, Amazon Web Services (AWS), has been offering a serverless product, called Lambda, for nearly two years.

Expect this trend to continue for the foreseeable future, as businesses of all sizes – and the developers building applications for them – strive for more efficiency and a stronger bottom line.

Keep visiting the Betica Blog for these and other insights from the always evolving worlds of software development and QA.