News from the World of Software Development – May 2018

git desktopp

Welcome to the May edition of the software development news digest here at the Betica Blog. We regularly take a look at some interesting stories influencing the application engineering world. Hopefully, they provide a measure of insight to help your own coding projects.

If you are interested in checking out last month’s digest, simply click on the following link. We cover an AI routine that knows how to code. As always, thanks for reading!

GitHub imagining the Future of Collaborative Software Development

The ubiquitous source code repository giant, GitHub, naturally lies at the center of most software development shops’ workflow. This gives the organization a unique ability to influence the overall engineering process across the industry. Collaborative development is one such natural area given the organization’s distributed source control system. An article about GitHub’s importance appeared this week at The Next Web.

A collaborative spirit existed at GitHub from the beginning. The company released a public API for its source control application soon after going live. The software teams behind Ruby on Rails and Bitcoin leveraged it for source control as well as an example of the power of team development.

Ultimately, these two facts highlight the reason the open source movement is so influential throughout the tech industry. Since GitHub is essentially the standard for source code control, it played a large role in transitioning coding from a solitary task to something more social and interactive.  Aaron Upright noted as much in his article for The Next Web.

“Contrasted with alternatives like GitLab and BitBucket, GitHub has taken a best-of-breed approach. It’s essentially created a platform from which it’s possible integrate the products and tools that are better than what it feels it can create. It’s not building chat tools or CI functionality or project management on its own; instead, it makes it easy to integrate Slack, or Circle CI, or whatever else you might want,” commented Upright.

In short, GitHub makes it easy to collaborate when coding; setting an example for – as well as influencing – the rest of the industry.

Oracle finally to remove Java Serialization Security Hole

Serialization is one of the most important functions in software development, allowing data objects to be easily distributed as byte streams. Unfortunately, Java’s serialization routines, in place for decades, create a security hole easily exploited by nefarious agents. Oracle recently announced they plan to remove serialization from future versions of Java. News about the change appeared this week in InfoWorld.

The company plans on an approach allowing developers to use their own serialization engine. It interacts with a small framework included in a future version of the “platform once records” – Java’s nomenclature for data classes. It is expected to support JSON and XML as well as other formats.

Oracle feels they made a massive mistake with the current version of serialization implemented in 1997. They noted that nearly one-half of all Java security vulnerabilities are because of this engine. The company recently added a way to filter the classes being serialized as one way to mitigate the risk before the new serialization framework gets introduced.

Oracle provided no information on which upcoming version of Java is slated to include the reengineered serialization framework. Stay tuned!

That’s it for this month’s news digest. Keep coming back for additional software development insights from the Betica Blog.   

GitHub Analysis reveals the Changing Face of Programming Language Usage

One obvious constant in the technology industry is its rapid pace of change, and the practice of programming offers no exception to this rule. What was once a popular language at the turn of the century might hardly get used for applications today. On the other hard, new programming languages seem to appear on a monthly basis.

Data from the source code repository, GitHub, offers a window on this changing face of software development. Let’s look more closely at their analysis to check the latest trends in programming language usage. Perhaps these insights might be of use in your own team’s development efforts?

393 Different Programming Languages at GitHub – in One Year!

GitHub boasts 4.5 million users who maintain around 10 TB of source code at the repository. Incredibly, those development projects are written in 393 different programming languages. Even more impressive is that data only represents one year of GitHub usage statistics!

Those numbers have only increased since the original July publication of an article by Waren Long at the source{d} blog used as a reference for this post. Another interesting point is their analysis doesn’t even include JavaScript, one of the most widely used languages, because of GitHub users’ propensity to refer to popular libraries, like Node.js or React.js, as a project’s language instead of JavaScript.

Long’s methodology for determining programming language is quite detailed, so refer to the link in the previous paragraph for additional insights, if interested. 

The Current Most Popular Programming Languages on GitHub

There are few surprises listed among the most popular languages currently in use at GitHub. Python and Java rank at the top of the list, with a popularity percentage of 16 and 15.3 respectively. That doesn’t necessarily mean both languages have more lines of source code stored in the repository. That honor lies with PHP, even though it only ranks at #5 on the popularity scale.

Other languages in the top 10 include the venerable, like C, C++, and C#, along with relative upstarts like Ruby, Objective-C, and Go. Apple’s newer programming language for iOS applications, Swift, rounds out the top 10. A related analysis adding in Google search queries to the GitHub data notes that Go is currently the “hottest” programming language.

Moving from One Language to Another

The original source{d} blog article also looked what languages programmers are transitioning into over time. This is useful information for both individual developers as well as software development shops. For example, many Visual Basic developers eventually transition into C#, which isn’t surprising for programmers working primarily on the Microsoft technology stack.

PHP developers, on the other hand, tend to move into Java, Python, or even C#. Python’s current popularity is confirmed by the fact that 24 percent of programmers working in the five other most popular languages — Java, C, C++, PHP, and Ruby – eventually work with Python. The “walled garden” nature of Apple platforms is revealed by the high percentage of programmers switching between Swift and Objective-C for project work.

Ultimately, anyone working as a programmer or a manager of software development needs to dive into the source{d} analysis of GitHub’s data. It’s truly fascinating.

Keep coming back to the Betica Blog for additional insights from the software development world. Thanks for reading!