Pitfalls to avoid when adopting DevOps

devops2As DevOps continues to grow in popularity, some organizations still struggle with its successful implementation. Perhaps developers really don’t understand the practice and chafe at being forced to follow its concepts? Maybe the network engineers feel DevOps favors the software team, while automating many of their standard administrative tasks?

Whatever the reasons for its difficulty in adoption, getting things right offers many benefits to software shops of all sizes. DevOps plays a key role in boosting development efficiency to the point it becomes a competitive advantage. So, let’s take a look at a few common pitfalls to avoid when adopting DevOps.

Avoid these Mistakes when adding DevOps at your Software Shop

Rebecca Dodd, from the software development process experts at GitLab, wrote an article for DZone covering these major pitfalls to avoid during a DevOps implementation. She talked with a few people at GitLab responsible for project success with their customer base. They provided interesting food for thought on what issues hamper DevOps adoption.

Focusing Too Much on the Tools

GitLab noted that companies who make too much of an investment on their toolset tend to encounter difficulty when implementing DevOps. GitLab Technical Account Manager, John Woods, commented on the issue. “You think you have it all when you’ve got your issue tracker, version control system, CI/CD service, etc. However, what’s the cost of setting all those up and configuring them to ‘talk’ to each other?” said Woods. 

In essence, the time spent configuring and integrating multiple tools takes up valuable time and resources. GitLab calls this the “DevOps Tax.” Make it a point to ensure you use tools that support your DevOps policies and procedures; not the other way around.

In a similar fashion, some companies simply become too attached to their development tools. This adds difficulty if those tools aren’t really compatible with the unique DevOps methodology. GitLab notes some customers try to wrench decades-old tools into their fledgling modern workflow.

Ultimately, the smartest tack involves finding the right integrated toolset compatible with how software gets written in a DevOps world.

Deployment and Monitoring are as Important as Development and Testing

Another pitfall noted by Dodd involves companies not covering the entire SDLC when adopting DevOps. Instead, the only follow its principles for software development and QA, ignoring it for the deployment and monitoring processes. Ultimately, this isn’t a true DevOps implementation.

In most cases, companies leverage DevOps to achieve continuous integration or continuous delivery. Reaching these goals isn’t possible without a full adoption of the methodology. In short, go hard or go home!

Security needs to be part of the DevOps Equation

We previously talked about the importance of information security as part of any DevOps implementation. This is one of the reasons DevSecOps is a hot buzzword. In these days, cybersecurity needs to be a core concept within any software development practice – DevOps or not.

GitLab notes that companies adopting DevOps who still treat security as an afterthought ultimately struggle with its implementation. Valuable resources end up making security-related fixes at the last minute. Consider a DevSecOps approach.

Ultimately, steer clear of these pitfalls to ensure your DevOps adoption goes great!

Keep coming back to the Betica Blog for additional insights and dispatches from the wide world of software development. Thanks for reading!

React.js gets a Fresh Update

reactJS

With Facebook’s founder testifying to the U.S. Congress, in unrelated news, the company’s React.js UI library for JavaScript recently received a new update. Version 16.3 of React provides a host of new features for developers hoping to add some efficiency to their web applications. If you are interested in downloading it, the update is available on Facebook’s own GitHub repository.

If your team isn’t using React, check out our previous articles covering it and its mobile variant, React Native. What follows is a high level overview of React version 16.3. News about the new update appeared in InfoWorld, among other sources.

A Look at the New Features of React.js 16.3

The main changes in the updated version of React involve improved management of the component lifecycle, as well as a new API to help developers better deal with context in their application. These new component lifecycles include: getDerivedStateFromProps and componentWillReceiveProps, which gives programmers a safer option than using the legacy versions. Another one, getSnapshotBeforeUpdate, safely handles the reading of properties before performing an update.

Some lifecycles are receiving an “unsafe” prefix to warn developers not to use them. Runtime safety isn’t the issue as much as the likelihood of deprecated functionality and subsequent incompatibility with future versions of React. In short, they are warning you about potential future bugs. Another reason for this is providing a “heads up” to engineers maintaining open source applications using React.

Facebook engineer, Brian Vaughan commented on what led to this new lifecycle functionality. “A few days ago, we wrote a post about upcoming changes to our legacy lifecycle methods, including gradual migration strategies. In React 16.3.0, we are adding a few new lifecycle methods to assist with that migration,” said Vaughan.

Another option involves using the new StrictMode component. This serves to identify any unsafe legacy lifecycles when running in development mode. It also warns about other side effects from using older lifecycles and React functionality. Expect additional features to be added to this component in future updates.

The New React Context API adds Efficiency

In addition to providing a boost in efficiency, React’s new Context API allows for static type checking and deep updates. Data is able to be passed through a component tree without the manual inclusion of props. The old API is expected to still work for a few more versions, so start updating your code to use to new one.

Facebook cautions about overusing the new API. “Don’t use context just to avoid passing props a few levels down. Stick to cases where the same data needs to be accessed in many components at multiple levels,” said the social network’s development team.

Other fresh features in React 16.3 include a new API for managing refs, called createrefAPI. This lets programmers access DOM nodes or React elements derived from the render process. The forwardRef API facilitates code reuse by help devs use higher-order components for this purpose.

Since React is effectively becoming a standard for UI development in web applications, we hope this look at its latest version provides some insights for you and your team. As always, thanks for reading the Betica Blog. We hope to see you again very soon!

Is FaaS – Features-as-a-Service – the Next Big Thing in Software Development?

The growing popularity of the Cloud-based service model has led to a plethora of acronyms ending in “aaS.” Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS), Software-as-a-Service (SaaS), and Database-as-a-Service (DBaaS) remain three of the most common examples of these service offerings in the tech industry. Businesses of all sizes enjoy cost savings by leveraging the Cloud in this manner.

Now software developers, trying to keep up in an increasingly rapid business world, have their own Cloud-based service acronym. Enter Features-as-a-Service (FaaS). Does FaaS give application engineers the chance to build more functional software faster and at a lower cost? Let’s take a look.

Code Reuse in a Cloud-based Wrapper

Code reuse is a traditional way for programmers to accomplish more by doing less. It’s one of the reasons libraries and APIs are so popular throughout the industry. We’ve covered this technology and API Testing extensively in the past on this very blog.

FaaS essentially just makes this process more componentized; delivering a library of functionality in a convenient Cloud-based wrapper for software engineers to use in their own applications. Instead of spending time reinventing the wheel, developers are able to focus on the unique functionality that makes their app special. Technology VP, JT Ripton commented on the FaaS trend

“Whereas on the backend developers already are using pay-as-you-go infrastructure such as Amazon Web Services for cloud computing and services such as Stripe for payment processing, FaaS takes the same approach but applies it to the front end,” said Ripton. He also notes developers struggling with implementing a public API need to consider FaaS as an option when speed is of the essence.

Scenarios where Usage of a FaaS is Smart

A variety of FaaS providers are currently supporting common functional areas within applications, potentially saving development teams both time and money. Mapbox is one such provider worthy of consideration when compared to Google’s Map API and its arcane documentation. A plug-and-play model simply works more efficiently in today’s era of Agile and DevOps.

Social interactivity is another good example. There is no need to build social functionality from scratch, when a provider like Tapglue offers their own FaaS. Their service includes functionality supporting user profiles and news feeds, as well as interactive features like sharing, commenting, and more.

Agora.io offers a FaaS that adds real time communication – voice and video – to an application. This would be a boon for a game developer working on a MMORPG or any other type of multiplayer title. Concentrate on your game’s functionality; not on getting codecs to work properly on a variety of devices.

Ripton stresses the essential difference between FaaS and other types of code reuse like an API is the front-end component. This is especially useful for teams without their own UI design talent. He feels this is a natural progression on how software gets written.

“FaaS is just the next evolution of the mashup and code reuse trend that’s been picking up steam over the past several decades. It isn’t a “revolutionary” idea, or even truly innovative. But it is perfectly in line with the way we code today — it is a new application of something we’ve seen before,” said Ripton.

Stay tuned to the Betica Blog for additional insights from an ever-changing software development world. Thanks for reading!