Is FaaS – Features-as-a-Service – the Next Big Thing in Software Development?

The growing popularity of the Cloud-based service model has led to a plethora of acronyms ending in “aaS.” Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS), Software-as-a-Service (SaaS), and Database-as-a-Service (DBaaS) remain three of the most common examples of these service offerings in the tech industry. Businesses of all sizes enjoy cost savings by leveraging the Cloud in this manner.

Now software developers, trying to keep up in an increasingly rapid business world, have their own Cloud-based service acronym. Enter Features-as-a-Service (FaaS). Does FaaS give application engineers the chance to build more functional software faster and at a lower cost? Let’s take a look.

Code Reuse in a Cloud-based Wrapper

Code reuse is a traditional way for programmers to accomplish more by doing less. It’s one of the reasons libraries and APIs are so popular throughout the industry. We’ve covered this technology and API Testing extensively in the past on this very blog.

FaaS essentially just makes this process more componentized; delivering a library of functionality in a convenient Cloud-based wrapper for software engineers to use in their own applications. Instead of spending time reinventing the wheel, developers are able to focus on the unique functionality that makes their app special. Technology VP, JT Ripton commented on the FaaS trend

“Whereas on the backend developers already are using pay-as-you-go infrastructure such as Amazon Web Services for cloud computing and services such as Stripe for payment processing, FaaS takes the same approach but applies it to the front end,” said Ripton. He also notes developers struggling with implementing a public API need to consider FaaS as an option when speed is of the essence.

Scenarios where Usage of a FaaS is Smart

A variety of FaaS providers are currently supporting common functional areas within applications, potentially saving development teams both time and money. Mapbox is one such provider worthy of consideration when compared to Google’s Map API and its arcane documentation. A plug-and-play model simply works more efficiently in today’s era of Agile and DevOps.

Social interactivity is another good example. There is no need to build social functionality from scratch, when a provider like Tapglue offers their own FaaS. Their service includes functionality supporting user profiles and news feeds, as well as interactive features like sharing, commenting, and more.

Agora.io offers a FaaS that adds real time communication – voice and video – to an application. This would be a boon for a game developer working on a MMORPG or any other type of multiplayer title. Concentrate on your game’s functionality; not on getting codecs to work properly on a variety of devices.

Ripton stresses the essential difference between FaaS and other types of code reuse like an API is the front-end component. This is especially useful for teams without their own UI design talent. He feels this is a natural progression on how software gets written.

“FaaS is just the next evolution of the mashup and code reuse trend that’s been picking up steam over the past several decades. It isn’t a “revolutionary” idea, or even truly innovative. But it is perfectly in line with the way we code today — it is a new application of something we’ve seen before,” said Ripton.

Stay tuned to the Betica Blog for additional insights from an ever-changing software development world. Thanks for reading!

DevOps becoming Standard at the Enterprise

A competitive business environment requires companies to work faster than ever before – including their software development initiatives. This remains one of the major reasons organizations look towards Agile as an application engineering methodology. Making Agile work efficiently requires better collaboration between the various departments within IT, with DevOps seeing increasingly wide adoption as an organizational structure to improve interaction between teams.

In fact, DevOps isn’t only for companies on the bleeding edge of innovation. It is fast becoming a standard at enterprises as well as smaller businesses. Let’s take a closer look at this trend, as it may be time to leverage the advantages of improved collaboration at your shop.

The Emerging Popularity of DevOps is linked with the Growth of the Cloud

Writing for BetaNews, IT infrastructure architect, Jon Topper feels the entry of DevOps into the enterprise mainstream is related to the now near-standard status of Cloud-based services at the business. “2016’s increase in adoption ties in directly with the growing confidence in and uptake of public cloud technologies too. DevOps and cloud remain closely linked; it’s our view that a cloud strategy without a DevOps approach will probably fail,” said Topper.

Since its introduction over six years ago, DevOps has undergone the same level of iterative improvement at those innovative companies first using the organizational structure. With more businesses looking at the Cloud for cost savings and productivity improvements, it now makes sense to use a now mature DevOps as part of a migration to a Cloud-based infrastructure.

A Nimble Business simply competes Better

Providing better customer service – at either a B2B or B2C level – remains a key factor separating the top companies from the also-rans no matter the industry. A desire for this kind of business agility is also causing enterprises to embrace DevOps to streamline their software development and infrastructure management processes with no loss in productivity. In short, a nimble business is a better competitor.

“We’re now getting to the stage where, without a DevOps approach, businesses can’t unlock agility without compromising on quality, security, and people. It’s become a requirement to stay ahead of the game,” comments Jon Topper.

DevOps Adoption brings many Benefits to a Business

Adopting a DevOps structure at an IT department provides a host of tangible benefits to the business. A yearly study – the State of DevOps Report – produced by the software development company, Puppet, details some of these gains. They include the ability to “deploy 200 times more frequently, with 2,555 times faster lead times, recover 24 times faster, and have three times lower change failure rates.”

Firms using DevOps also enjoy higher employee loyalty ratings. They spent 22 percent less time on reworking code; allowing 29 percent more time for new features and innovations, according to the Puppet Study. In short, DevOps is a must if an enterprise wants to successfully compete in today’s business landscape.

Looking at the informed analysis of an IT industry pundit combined with hard numbers from a research study, it is easy to understand why DevOps is rapidly becoming the standard at today’s technology shop. Businesses who forego it do so at their own peril!

Stay tuned to the Betica Blog for additional insights and dispatches from the world of software development. Thanks for reading!

Agile and DevOps make Perfect Partners

A recent technology report came to a conclusion that won’t be a surprise to many of you. It seems Agile and DevOps offer more benefits when paired together at an organization compared to when they are implemented individually. This makes sense when considering DevOps grew out of a need for a better organizational structure for technology projects using Agile.

With the hopes of making your application development process more efficient, this article looks at the details of the report to find those actionable insights relevant to your software engineering organization. Good luck in your efforts!

The CA Technologies Report on Agile and DevOps

CA Technologies commissioned a study by Coleman Parkes Research to ask technology executives on how their organizations’ implementation of Agile and DevOps is transforming their business operations. The study’s lead conclusion noted that 81 percent of the surveyed executives feel Agile and DevOps are a vital aspect of their operational evolution. The study’s other insights also provide food for thought for your managerial team.

Over 80 percent of those surveyed said their organizations are currently using either Agile or DevOps. Still, only one-third of those senior executives felt either methodology was sufficiently implemented at their business. CA Technologies concluded that this highlighted a maturity gap needing to be fixed for those businesses to truly evolve their operations.

The Benefits of Mature Agile and DevOps Programs are Numerous

Companies able to successfully implement both Agile and DevOps all across their organization see numerous benefits according to the executives in the survey. Advanced Agile users are able to act on important decisions sooner than those new to the methodology. Experienced DevOps enterprises implement ideas 42 percent faster than those companies not using the organizational structure.

Adding DevOps to an organization already well-versed in Agile causes new business growth to increase by 63 percent compared to companies only doing Agile. Operational efficiency also improves by 41 percent. These last two conclusions from the study should be enough to convince most larger technology shops to combine Agile and DevOps instead of merely doing one or the other.

The survey also noted some of the leading factors preventing a company-wide implementation of Agile and DevOps. Security issues ranked as the top reason for both methodologies, followed by budgetary concerns, and the lack of integration tools. Organizational culture and resistance to change are also contributing factors.

Using Agile beyond Information Technology

The CA Technologies study also mentioned that Agile offers benefits to organizations that go beyond their IT department. Some of the surveyed executives noted their companies use Agile in the marketing (54 percent), customer service (53 percent), and sales departments (52 percent.) Finally, only six percent of the companies have implemented Agile across their entire enterprise.

Angela Tucci, CA Technologies’ general manager for Agile management summed up the survey’s conclusion. “Agile and DevOps practices lead to happier, more productive employees…which in turn leads to happier, more satisfied customers. And when Agile and DevOps are practiced together, the benefits are even better,” said Tucci.

When you need additional insights on the ever-changing software development world, come back to the Betica Blog. Thanks for your readership!