PostgreSQL 10 – New Features and Functionality

PostgreSQL remains a popular option for organizations that need a traditional SQL database, but don’t want to spend the money required for Oracle. We’ve covered this open source database in the past here on the blog. For those companies who want extra support, a commercial Postgre option like EnterpriseDB needs to be considered.

With PostgreSQL 10 scheduled for release later this year, many users are undoubtedly curious about the new features and functionality. Let take a closer look at what’s in the feature set so you can consider either an upgrade or using this new version on your next development project.

Improved Query Performance

One of the most important enhancements in PostgreSQL 10 is its faster query executor. The database is already known for performing essentially as fast as Oracle, so any additional speed boost is sure to make those benchmark comparisons even closer.

Robert Haas, Vice President for Enterprise DB and a major contributor to the PostgreSQL codebase, commented on the technical changes behind the executor’s performance boost. “Hash aggregation has been rewritten to use a more efficient hash table and store narrower tuples in it, and work has also been done to speed up queries that compute multiple aggregates and joins where one side can be proven unique,” said Haas.

Improved parallelism is another enhancement in Postgre aimed at boosting query performance. Haas noted that parallel queries now run two to four times faster in version 10. Index scanning is another function now faster because of parallel processing.

The new XMLTABLE support improves query processing against data stored internally as XML. This is the one PostgreSQL 10 enhancement aimed at the NoSQL market.

Replication is now Better – and Easier

PostgreSQL 10 now supports replication at the table level; previous versions required the full database to be replicated. This additional flexibility comes with the bonus of being easier to use as well. Called Logical Replication, it is a feature greatly anticipated in the PostgreSQL community.

Extended Statistics help with Query Planning

Developers who write complex queries against a PostgreSQL 10 instance enjoy the benefit of expanded statistics that help the query planning process. Haas explains this in more detail: “If the query planner makes a bad row count estimate resulting in a terrible plan, how do you fix it?  With extended statistics, you can tell the system to gather additional statistics according to parameters that you specify, which may help it get the plan right.”

Other PostgreSQL 10 Enhancements

Other significant Postgre 10 improvements include Declarative Partitioning which makes inserting new records faster, among other benefits. Support for SCRAM authentication enhances the security of a database instance. Durable Hash Indexes are another new feature aimed at boosting database performance.

One future enhancement potentially coming out in a point release is just-in-time compilation. This is expected to add yet another performance boost to any PostgreSQL implementation.

PostgreSQL 10 definitely adds enough new functionality for current users as well as organizations interested in an alternative to Oracle. While its NoSQL support remains limited, it is definitely a traditional SQL database worthy of your interest. EnterpriseDB also offers commercial-level support for companies still wary of an open source solution.

Keep returning to the Betica Blog for additional dispatches from the software development world. Thanks for reading!

Does an Informal Approach to DevOps work Best?

The DevOps approach to an IT department’s organizational structure continues to make inroads throughout the technology industry. As companies strive to reach a continuous delivery model for both new software and code enhancements, DevOps seems like a wise choice for most. Increased competition requires businesses to embrace a variety of innovations when it comes to software development.

One recent industry study questions whether an informal approach to implementing the methodology actually works better than a more sharply defined process. Here is a closer look at what their study discovered. Perhaps the survey’s findings make sense for your team’s approach to DevOps or even Agile?

A Paradoxical DevOps Survey Finding

Hewlett Packard Enterprise’s Digital Research Team surveyed a wide range of technology enterprises on their process maturity, a concept essentially the same as the Capability Maturity Model first developed at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute. John Jeremiah, a technology evangelist for HPE, wrote about the survey for TechBeacon.

The survey queried over 400 technology professionals at larger enterprises about their approach to DevOps. The ultimate goal of the study involved determining what processes led to success in implementing this new organizational structure. Finding out the maturity level of the respondents’ DevOps deployment was an important differentiator in the survey.

These four maturity levels included research/evaluation, pilot project, partial implementation, and widespread implementation. Surprisingly, the study didn’t show a correlation between the DevOps maturity level and a more efficient software delivery process. Diving deeper reveals a few answers that may help your own organization’s approach to DevOps.

Getting High Quality Code into Production Faster – with Agile

The survey noted those who took a more informal approach to DevOps – with many still in the research stage of process maturity – enjoyed faster release cycles with fewer code defects. These findings almost seem counterintuitive. Why are they able to write and test better software than those companies more experienced with DevOps?

The probable answer lies within one word: Agile. A vast majority of the survey respondents still researching and evaluating DevOps were already very experienced in Agile, especially compared to those companies higher on the process maturity level. Focusing on the strong communication and collaboration typical of an Agile shop is more important than the structures and processes found within a mature DevOps implementation.

In short, as we commented earlier in this very blog – Agile and DevOps make perfect partners. The HPE study notes that an informal approach to DevOps, focusing on a collaborative Agile culture, plays a key role in making the software development process more efficient. The study revealed those companies first exploring DevOps already used some of its typical tools and processes because of Agile. These include ChatOps, containers, automation, and more.

In fact, companies researching DevOps with the hopes of achieving continuous delivery would do well to “go Agile” before restructuring their IT organization. Reaching DevOps “maturity” by itself is no guarantee of efficient software development. As Jeremiah summarizes the study finding, “DevOps is not a destination; it’s a journey.”

Become a regular reader of the Betica Blog for additional insights on the innovative world of software development. Thanks for checking it out!

News from the World of Software Development – March 2017

Welcome to this month’s software development and QA news digest. As 2017 enters its third month, the application engineering world continues to evolve at a rapid pace. If you are interested in February’s digest, simply click on this link.

Hopefully, you are able to leverage these insights to improve or inform your organization’s software engineering process.

Software Engineering Trends going Mainstream

Earlier this month, The Next Web published a story from the software intelligence company, Raygun, looking at three software development trends essentially becoming standard practice. We covered some of these same directional shifts in our 2017 industry trends article, and it is interesting to see them widely adopted.

The growth of ChatOps to enhance communication amongst a development team is one trend Raygun noted. ChatOps even allows software engineers and QA personnel to kick off builds and automated tests from a chatbot interface, while the entire team stays in the loop. The use of bots works well for companies already embracing DevOps and a continuous deployment model.

Speaking of continuous deployment, it is another one of the trends highlighted in the Raygun article. An increasingly competitive business world places the onus on companies to build and maintain applications faster than ever before. Following a continuous delivery model allows firms to deploy new code several times a day.

The increased use of software intelligence was the third trend discussed by Raygun, which isn’t a surprise, considering the company’s main line of business. Leveraging this form of automated intelligence hastens the discovery of problems or issues before the customer.

“Software intelligence gives you the ability to automatically detect when a user’s experience was poor and how you can improve it, with full diagnostic details being provided for every individual user error, crash or performance issue,” the article mentioned. This new era of application performance monitoring is one worth watching by anyone responsible for public-facing applications.

The Principles of Agile Software Development

Late March saw the appearance of a Forbes article in our news feed detailing the daily principles of Agile software development. While this is more of an evergreen topic than “news” per se, anyone new to Agile would benefit from studying these concepts. Scott Stiner, the CEO of UM Technologies, a software firm focusing on innovative user experience (UX) design, authored the article.

Stiner highlights the fact that traditional software engineering methodologies – most notably the Waterfall – lack the iteration compatible with the modern business world. The high cost of finding defects too late in the development process isn’t a risk many organizations want to take. This, combined with the faster speed of business noted earlier, is a major reason many software shops have embraced Agile over the last decade.

Early delivery of prototypes and strong customer interaction remain a major focus of Agile. Changes to requirements are welcome; not considered to be scope creep as with older methodologies. Analyze the rest of these Agile principles to see if a change in how you write applications makes sense for your organization.

Keep coming back to the Betica Blog for additional news and information regarding the wide world of software development. As always – thanks for reading!